Gender Pay Reporting

Last Updated
June 17, 2024

Introduction

From April 2017, all organisations that employ over 250 are required to carry out Gender Pay Reporting under the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017.

The gender pay gap is defined as the differences in the average earnings of men and women over a standard time, regardless of their role seniority. This involves carrying out six calculations that show the difference between the average earnings of men and women in our organisation.

The figures reported must be calculated using the ‘snap shot’ date of 5th April each year. Organisations must publish their report within a year of this date. This report therefore analyses data from 5th April 2023.

Gender Analysis

Level % Male % Female
All company 2022 31.06% 68.94%
All company 2023 31.28% 68.72%

Gender Pay Reporting

2022 2023
Mean gender pay gap 29.6% 22.9%
Median gender pay gap 15.7% 8.4%
Mean bonus pay gap 51.9% 65.4%
Median bonus pay gap 37.7% 45.6%
Proportion male receiving bonus 30.6% 80.5%
Proportion female receiving bonus 44.6% 87.7%

The mean gender pay gap is the difference between the average of men’s and women’s hourly rate pay. The median gender pay gap is the difference between the midpoints in the ranges of men’s and women’s hourly rate pay.

Quartile Pay Bands

Quartile pay bands 2022 Lower Quartile Lower Middle Quartile Upper Middle Quartile Upper Quartile
Male 27% 24% 28% 49%
Female 73% 76% 72% 51%
Quartile pay bands 2023 Lower Quartile Lower Middle Quartile Upper Middle Quartile Upper Quartile
Male 26% 27% 22% 45%
Female 74% 73% 78% 55%

Summary

Overall, our results for 2023 show the Mean Gap has decreased by 6.7% and the Median by 7.3% which is positive and can be attributed to the work we have done over the last few years. The initiatives we have in place have made progress in levelling out the pay gap and we continue to review initiatives that aim to reduce this further.

Our workforce continues to remain predominantly female, and at our upper quartile the split between men and women is evening, representing a balance in senior positions – 55% female and 45% male.

However, men and women are not equally represented at all other levels within the workforce. Analysis of our data across our four pay quartiles shows that, in the lower three quartiles there is still a significantly higher proportion of women, although the proportions have decreased since last year.

This disparity is the root cause of our overall mean and median gender pay gap.

Jane Harrington
Group HR Director
April 2023